Frequently Asked Questions

  1.  I think my child may be dyslexic.
  2. Can I go to my GP to get my child assessed for dyslexia?
  3. My school say my child is too young to be assessed.
  4. My school tells me that they have done a test in school.
  5. Are there specialist schools for dyslexic children?
  6. What can I do to help my child at home?
  7. I have heard that coloured overlays can help dyslexic children.
  8. What help can a dyslexic pupil be offered for tests and exams?
  9. Is it possible for someone who is dyslexic to learn a foreign language?

 

Q1. I think my child may be dyslexic,

Ask the school secretary for a copy of the school’s Information Report and Special Needs Policy, then make an appointment to talk to the class teacher. A family history would be a strong indicator, and other indicators as listed on: Indications of Dyslexia and Getting Help for Your Child pages.

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Q2. Can I go to my GP to get my child assessed for dyslexia?

Sadly no, dyslexia assessments are not funded by the NHS. 

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Q3. My school say my child is too young to be assessed.

As soon as difficulties become apparent, and particularly where a child is becoming distressed or showing behavioural problems intervention is always recomended. Oook at the School Inforamtion Report and the school SEN Policy as they will informed you as to the schools intervention and assessment proceses. 

The B.D.A. offers a diagnostic service and for details: http://www.bdadyslexia.org.uk/services/assessments

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Q4. My school tells me that they have done a test in school.

Tests conducted in school, might only be screening tests. These can indicate dyslexic tendencies but may not be totally reliable. 

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Q5. Are there specialist schools for dyslexic children?

The Local Authority should have a list of specialist schools. Specialist independent schools supporting dyslexic pupils can be found on www.crested.org.uk.

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Q6. What can I do to help my child at home?

There are numerous resources to help you. For suggestions for supporting pre-school children, please see our information sheet: Early Help, Better Future. You could also visit our Homework Tips section.

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Q7. I have heard that coloured overlays can help dyslexic children.

Coloured filters, either as overlays or glasses with coloured tinted lenses may be helpful. For information on eyes and dyslexia and specialist practitioners, see Eyes and Dyslexia.

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Q8. What help can a dyslexic pupil be offered for tests and exams?

See Access Arrangements.

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Q9. Is it possible for someone who is dyslexic to learn a foreign language?

See Modern Foreign Languages for more information.

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